• Round Kick:  A traditional martial arts roundhouse kick.  There are many ways to perform this kick, but the general guideline is that the foot is turned horizontally upon striking its target.  The contact point, traditionally, is anywhere from the top of the foot to the middle of the shin, or the ball of the foot.  It is common for trickers to use a pointed toe for this kick to add length and greater aesthetic value.
  • Hook Kick:  A traditional martial arts hook kick.  There are many ways to perform this kick, but the general guideline is that the foot is turned horizontally upon striking its target.  The contact point, traditionally, is the heel of the foot.  This is often done by using the back of the heel, just below the achilles tendon.  Another way is to point the toe, and strike with either the heel, or the entire bottom of the foot.  Trickers often adopt the pointed toe to add length and greater aesthetic value.
  • Inside Crescent Kick:  Similar to the round kick, but generally done with a straight leg.  The key difference is that the foot stays vertical throughout this kick, and strikes with the inside edge, and arch of the foot.  In context, the direction will often be dropped in favor of the simpler ‘crescent’ tag.
  • Outside Crescent Kick:  Similar to the hook kick, but generally done with a straight leg.  The key difference is that the foot stays vertical throughout this kick, and strikes with the outside edge of the foot, also known as the blade of the foot.  In context, the direction will often be dropped in favor of the simpler ‘crescent’ tag.
  • Inside Kick: A generic term usually referring to either a round, or inside crescent kick.  However, this can refer to any substituted kick traveling inward.
  • Outside Kick: A generic term usually referring to either a hook, or outside crescent kick.  However, this can refer to any substituted kick traveling outward.
  • Frontside:  A stance in which the performer’s chest is turned 90 degrees from the target, and their inside kicking leg is nearest the target.  Often this means that you face into your momentum while comboing.
  • Backside:  A stance in which the performer’s chest is turned 90 degrees from the target, and their outside kicking leg is nearest the target.  Often this means that you face away from your momentum while comboing.
  • Darkside:  The opposite side, or doing a trick with the opposite direction of spin from normal.  It is somewhat uncommon for trickers to utilize both sides, or directions of spin, so tricks done on the non-dominant orientation, or from the opposite side during a combo, are referred to as being darksided.
  • Inside Stance:  A stance between frontside and backside where the performer’s hips face toward the target.  It is not uncommon for some trickers to adopt the inside stance as their backside stance.
  • Outside Stance:  A stance between backside and frontside where the performer’s hips face away from the target.  It is fairly common to see trickers adopt the outside stance as their frontside stance.
  • Transition:  The method of connecting 2 tricks in a combo.  Transitions are broken into several types based on the sequence of landing one trick, and taking off into the next.  Simply put, this is what happens on the ground between tricks.  It is the sequence of landing and taking off.
  • Vert Kick:  A kick delivered with no major degree of inversion.  The performer stays upright throughout the entire trick.
  • Twist:  For the purpose of this site, twist will always describe rotation on the vertical axis during an inverted trick.  It is not uncommon for people to refer to any rotation on the vertical axis as twist, regardless of the performer’s orientation.
  • Mainstream (Terminology):  The most common language and set of terms used by trickers.  Many of the names date back to the origins of tricking and sport karate circuits of the 1990’s.  Mainstream terminology is more or less an oral tradition.  Many definitions and concepts can be deduced from common usage and older sites, but there is no central location or formal standardization.  It is a loose system with varying perspectives and opinions.
  • TKT (True Kick Terminology):  A systemized approach to the study of tricking, founded by Dan Perez DeTejada.  This system is widely known for its more literal names for kicks.  TKT is often synonymous with Aeriform which is known for its systemized break down of all parts of tricking, from takeoffs and landings, to transitional definitions, and beyond.
  • Target:  The imaginary point, or general direction where the performer’s attacks are focused.  This is often more of a cardinal direction rather than a specific point.  As the performer travels in any direction, the target continues to travel with them which helps to clearly define rotational amount and stance.  Some trickers prefer to target multiple directions throughout their combo, which can cause a degree of ambiguity at times, but is generally accepted by the wider community.
  • Momentum Line:  The imaginary line created by a tricker as they travel during a combo.  The momentum line is generally perpendicular to the target both in practice and in theory.  Using the cardinal directions of a compass, if the target is designated as North, the momentum line will generally be described as East to West for left twisters, or West to East for right twisters.