• Aeriform (Aeriformmat.com):  The main site for TKT users.  Aeriform could also be said to be a system of understanding, learning, and teaching, and is the basis for many of the concepts and definitions in Tricktheory because of it standardization and uniformity from user to user.
  • Ambi:  Short for ambidextrous.  This generally refers to ability to perform a given trick on both sides, but can also mean the ability to do a trick on the opposite side, also known as the darkside, only
  • Backswing:  A takeoff in which the performer’s leg travels from back to front in a pendulum motion, similarly to kicking a ball.  This is typically used to initiate back flipping motions such as gainers and corks.
  • Backside:  A stance in which the performer’s chest is turned 90 degrees from the target, and their outside kicking leg is nearest the target.  Generally this means that you face away from your momentum while comboing.  Simply stated, the performer’s back faces the way they travel.
  • Blocking:  A term used to describe the transfer of linear momentum into vertical lift.  In many cases, the mission of the block is to translate all of the momentum into lift, thereby stopping travel in favor of greater height.
  • Boneless:  A description of the type of vanish applied when transitioning from a hyper landing into a cork without changing the line of momentum.  (Advanced)
  • Bound:  The secondary form of all Unified transitions.  A bound follows the pattern of a unified transition, but has an extra adjustment step between the landing and takeoff.  (Beginner / Advanced)
  • Carrythrough:  The secondary form of the swingthrough transition.  A carrythrough is any swingthrough performed with an extra pivot, or stance change.   For many, this is synonymous with a frontswing, though this has been largely discredited.  (Beginner / Advanced)
  • Chamber:  The act of preparing a kick before execution.  This is generally seen as lifting the knee before the extension.
  • Cheat (Takeoff):  A method of takeoff where the performer lifts their outside kicking leg while pivoting up to 180 degrees in the direction of their typical rotation, and somewhat emulates a spinning hook kick.  This takeoff can be performed from either backside or frontside stances, but is most commonly seen starting in frontside.  This takeoff is commonly referred to as a ‘wrap’ takeoff when performed from a backside stance.
  • Crowd Awakener (CA):  A side split, or straddled variation in which two inverted round kicks are performed.  In practice however, most circumstances where a wide straddle is achieved will still bare the name, regardless of actual kicks performed.
  • Combo:  Multiple tricks or movements completed in succession.
  • Complete (Stance):  The most common landing position from the invert axis that typically lands on the performer’s outside kicking leg, with the performer’s momentum pulling backward.  This stance allows the performer to typically swing through into a backswing motion.  This is the marker at which twisting tricks are measured as single, double, triple, etc. and is almost never named.  (Beginner / Advanced)
  • Cutter:  A nod to the Boxcutter, this suffix is generally used on an inverted axis in place of the term Hyper-Hook, and can be considered slang.
  • Cyclone:  A term used almost exclusively in TKT, it is a variation where the performer executes an outside kick followed by 360 degrees of rotation (Hyper + Half Gyro), and another outside kick.  In mainstream terminology, a cyclone is a “double” kicking variation with hook kicks.
  • Darkside:  The opposite side, or doing a trick with the opposite direction of spin from normal.  It is somewhat uncommon for trickers to utilize both sides, or directions of spin, so tricks done on the non-dominant orientation are referred to as being darksided.
  • Double Leg (Dleg):  Both a unique trick and a variation type, or position in the air, it is modeled after the Armada Dupla from capoeira, and can be described as gymnastics pike position while twisting.
  • Double (Kicking):  This variation is most often associated with any kick followed by 360 degrees of rotation (Hyper + Half Gyro) and another of the same kick.  Another more rare variation has two of the same kick on a target with no rotation performed between them.  Technically, anytime two kicks are delivered in-air it can be called a double, but there is usually a more appropriate suffix to use.  In mainstream terminology, the name of the trick begins with the highest rotation and ends with the ‘double’ suffix.  For example:  pop-720-double.
  • Double (Twisting):  Any inverted trick with two twists around the vertical axis ending at the complete landing position.
  • Dub:  A slang term for a double twist.  Occasionally this term will be thrown around for vert kicks as well, but its most common usage refers to inverted tricks.
  • Eagle:  A slang term for the starting position utilized for backswings.  It is characterized by the swing leg lifted behind the body and the arms back.
  • Envergado:  A fully inverted parafuso.  Another way to look at this trick is as an inverted raiz into a double leg.  The ‘enver’ prefix can be used to note an envergado followed by a variation suffix, such as enver-snapu:  and envergado followed by a full twist.
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