• Fake (Landing Stances):  Terms coined by Ben Atkins to describe an atypical landing position.  (Discussed Here)
  • Fei Long:  An in-air kicking combination in which an outside kick is followed by 180 degrees of rotation and an inside kick to the same target.  Generally this is done with crescent kicks, as they allow the hips to stay open and more freely execute both kicks.  This is both a specific vert kick, as well as a variation type on both the vertical and inverted axis.  (Vert / Invert)
  • Fei Long Cross:  A specific variation of the Fei Long in which a hook and round are used.
  • Feint:  A faked kick. Most often, this means a vert kick is performed and the kick is only chambered, but never extended. The term ‘Fake’ is often used to mean the same thing.
  • Feiwrong:  A suffix used almost exclusively in TKT to note a true-hyper outside kick landing in a backside stance.
  • Flagella:  An old slang term for a round kick followed by a missleg transition into a btwist or aerial.  Contemporary wisdom argues this transition is actually a swingthrough that utilizes a frontswing, and not a missleg as it has been traditionally understood to be.
  • Flamingo:  Similar to the ‘eagle’ position, but in reverse.  The flamingo is the starting position for a frontswing and is characterized by the swinging leg extended in front of the body and the arms raised up, ready to be swung backward.
  • Gainer:  Unlike traditional gymnastics, the tricking gainer does not require forward motion.  It is simply a backflip performed from one leg, generally from a swing takeoff.  This term is often used casually to refer to both the gainer-flash kick, and the gainer-switch, allowing for context to imply which is being used.  The gainer prefix is usually used to note a swing takeoff into an inverted trick.
  • GC:  Generic Combo.  This is a relatively uncommon term that came about in reply to the prevalent use of the ‘OC’, or Original Combo, term to describe combos that lack any real imagination or creativity.  Simply put, GC’s have been done so often by so many people that they are almost compulsory routines.
  • Grab:  Similar to board sports, it is simply the act of grabbing a part of the body, generally the leg or feet, with the hand.
  • Grandmaster:  A trick performed from a master swing where the hands do not touch the ground.  For example, a masterswipe without landing on the hands becomes a grandmasterswipe.
  • Gyro:  Both a specific and general term for an added 360 degree spin or twist after a kick.  Gyro is generally used for vertical tricks, and implies that the extra rotation occurs with the performer upright, after a hyper.  It is not uncommon for some people to also use the gyro tag to describe a vertical twist on the way down from inverted tricks as well.  Within the vert kicking realm, Gyro can also be divided into Half-Gyro, for 180 degree rotations after a hyper.  Many mainstream (terminology) users do not use specific rotational degrees, nor the term Half-Gyro, allowing any substantial rotation near 360 degrees post-kick to bare the Gyro suffix.  Among TKT users, a true hyper-gyro is 540 degrees of rotation after a kick (180 for the hyper + 360 for the gyro).
  • Gyroknife:  A specific trick, and a type of variation on the knife pattern, gyroknifes have an entire 540 degrees of rotation (Hyper + Gyro) between the inside kick and outside kick, rather than the standard 180 degrees.
  • Half-Gyro:  See Gyro. An additional 180 degrees of rotation after a hyper.
  • Hawkeye:  A variation in which any inside kick is replaced with a hook kick. This is often looked at as a darkside hook kick because the leg performing it is usually used exclusively for inside kicking.
  • Hook Kick:  A traditional martial arts hook kick.  There are many ways to perform this kick, but the general guideline is that the foot is turned horizontally upon striking its target.  The contact point, traditionally, is the heel of the foot.  This is often done by using the back of the heel, just below the achilles tendon.  Another way is to point the toe, and strike with either the bottom of the heel, or the entire bottom of the foot.  Trickers often adopt the pointed toe to add length and greater aesthetic value.
  • Hyper (General):  Originally, hyper was used to note the over-rotation of a trick, and landing on the opposite foot.  While this understanding still persists, it is widely becoming understood to be more specific than this, and further disambiguated.
  • Hyper (Stance):  A landing position on the invert axis where the performer rotates past the complete position, and lands on their inside kicking leg, with the performer’s momentum pulling backward or toward their inside flipping shoulder.  This position typically allows the performer to wrapthrough, or swingthrough into masterswings.  (Beginner / Advanced)
  • Hyper (Vert):  This generally means to land on the kicking leg.  In the TKT system, this term is specifically a 180 degree rotation after a kick, landing on both feet simultaneously.  This term can also be, and often is, used as a blanket term, allowing the following transitional tag to express the difference between a Hyper (TKT) landing, and a True-Hyper landing.
  • Hyper-Hook:  A variation used on the invert axis, this suffix means that the trick was taken to the hyper landing, and an additional hook kick was executed before landing.  This term is occasionally used similarly in vert kicking, but is generally a misnomer, as other suffixes generally apply better.  Hyperhook is also a proper name for a Btwist Hyper-Hook.
  • Hyper-Style (Vert):  A landing in which 180 degrees of rotation is performed after a vertical kick, but the non-kicking landing leg is still used.  This is a term used mostly within TKT, and rarely heard in mainstream terminology.
  • Inside Crescent Kick:  Similar to the round kick, but generally done with a straight leg.  The key difference is that the foot stays vertical throughout this kick, and strikes with the inside edge, and arch of the foot.
  • Inside Flip:  A term used almost exclusively in TKT, the inside flip is a side flip toward the direction the performer twists, and is often performed from an inside stance.  A right twister would inside flip over their right shoulder.  The inside flip is considered the base flip for the Tak axis, as well as the master swing.
  • Inside Kick:  A generic term usually referring to either a round, or inside crescent kick.
  • Inside Stance:  A stance between frontside and backside where the performer’s hips face squarely toward the target.  It is not uncommon for some trickers to adopt the inside stance as their backside stance, and is commonly accepted as such in combos.
  • Invert:  The act of flipping within a trick.  In order to be a true inverted trick, the hips must reach a point higher than the performer’s head during the trick.  In general, tricks reaching approximately horizontal orientation, or where the hips are level with the performer’s head, are often considered inverted tricks.
  • Jackknife:  An in-air kicking combination in which an inside kick is followed by 180 degrees of rotation and an outside kick to the same target.  Generally this is done with a round kick followed by a hook kick.  The round is often preferred because it more freely snaps the hips over, allowing the hook to follow.
  • J Step:  A common setup used for swinging tricks.  The performer steps for ward with a variable number of steps, usually two.  As they step with their final step onto the outside leg, the foot is turned 90 degrees outward, and the trailing leg is swung through.  The turn creates a ‘J’ pattern on the ground, and initiates a torque in the hips as they turn to square themselves, increasing power on the swing.
  • Jujimufu (Juji):  The owner and operator of Trickstutorials, an early and extremely influential tricking website.  Trickstutorials is arguably the most influential tricking site ever, and can credited with birthing, or at least fostering, the early careers of many of the greatest trickers of all time.
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