• Katana (Vert):  A True-Hyper inside kick.  This term is used almost exclusively in TKT communities and is almost never used by mainstream users.
  • Knife:  See Jackknife, and Swipe Knife.  This suffix is generally added to both inverted tricks and vertical kicks, and implies either a hypered inside kick or swipe was performed at some point, and that the trick will land with an additional hook.
  • Kyro:  Any hyper-hook followed by an additional twist or gyro. In terms of the use of this suffix, the hyper-hook is implied and should not be named. For example:  boxcutter-twist = cork kyro, not boxcutter-kyro.
  • K Step:  A term generally used to describe a variation of the cheat takeoff where a slight stutter, or double pivot, is created on the base leg.  This form of the cheat takeoff is popular among the Korean trickers and as such was dubbed the ‘K step’, or ‘Korean Step’.
  • Landing Stance:  The position in which a trick terminates.  For both vertical and inverted tricks there are a multitude of possible positions, each carrying their own transitional possibilities.
  • Late- :  A variation usually followed by a number implying a kick type in mainstream terminology, this is characterized by large over rotation on the invert axis, ending in either mega with an inside kick, or more rarely by changing axis to twist vertically into an outside kick.  The numeric value assigned to the “late” tag corresponds to vertical backside kick using mainstream terminology.  This means that single-mega skills are assigned the title “Late9”, “Late 900”, or “Late-round” because their total rotation, not counting the flip, approximately corresponds to the backside900.  “Late” hook tricks will use the corresponding hook vert kick numbers, such as 720 or 1080.
  • Mainstream (Terminology):  The most common language and set of terms used by trickers.  Many of the names date back to the origins of tricking and sport karate circuits of the 1990’s.  Mainstream terminology is more or less an oral tradition.  Many definitions and concepts can be deduced from common usage and older sites, but there is no central location or formal standardization.  It is a loose system with varying perspectives and opinions.
  • Master:  Also referred to as a masterswing, is a swing takeoff where the performer’s leading leg is elevated and swings inward, closing the legs and initiating an inside flip.  Tricks involving a master swing tend to bare the prefix ‘master’, or ‘grandmaster’.  The difference between the master and grandmaster is simply whether or not the performer’s hands touch during the trick.  In a master- trick, the performer will land on their hands before finishing the trick, where a grandmaster trick is completed entirely in the air.
  • Mega (Stance):  A landing position on the invert axis where the performer rotates past the hyper position and lands on the outside kicking leg, with their momentum pulling them forward or toward their inside flipping shoulder.  This stance is 180 degrees past the complete landing stance, and can be looked at as a half rotation.  Mega landings allow the performer to swingthrough into frontswing, aerial, and btwist axis tricks.  (Basic / Advanced)
  • Mega-Round:  See Late-.  A suffix used to describe landing a trick in the mega position with a round kick.  This is more commonly referred to as a ‘Late’ round.
  • Missleg:  A singular transition in which the in-air leg rebounds into the next trick.  It could be said that the leg literally misses the ground, and changes its path to create takeoff.  (Basic / Advanced)
  • Momentum Line:  The imaginary line created by a tricker as they travel during a combo.  The momentum line is generally perpendicular to the target both in practice and in theory.  Using the cardinal directions of a compass, if the target is designated as North, the momentum line will generally be described as East to West for left twisters, or West to East for right twisters.
  • Murder:  A name describing a swingthrough where the swinging leg was grabbed in the previous trick, and held throughout the transition.  For example, when doing a cork-rodeo, landed holding the rodeo grab, and swung into another cork, the second cork would be described as a murder cork.
  • NASKA:  The North American Sport Karate Association.  NASKA is one of the oldest, most prestigious sport karate leagues, and is one of the birth places of many of the tricks found in tricking today, as well as its early practitioners.
  • OC:  Original Combo.  The ‘OC’ is a slang term used to note any combo with a particularly high degree of originality, creativity, and often technicality.
  • Outside Crescent Kick:  Similar to the hook kick, but generally done with a straight leg. The key difference is that the foot stays vertical, or toes facing up, throughout this kick, and strikes with the outside edge of the foot, also known as the blade of the foot.
  • Outside Flip:  A term used almost exclusively in TKT, the outside flip is a side flip in the opposite direction of the performer’s twisting direction, and is performed from an outside stance.  A right twister would flip over their left shoulder.  The outside flip is considered the base flip for the raiz axis.
  • Outside Kick:  A generic term usually referring to either a hook, or outside crescent kick.
  • Outside Stance:  A stance between backside and frontside where the performer’s hips face away from the target.  It is very common to see trickers adopt the outside stance as their frontside stance, particularly when taking off for vert kicks.
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