• Complete:  Also named by the number of rotations completed, such as single, double, triple, etc, the complete landing is the most common landing because it requires the least rotation, has a natural feeling, and is widely utilized for swingthrough transitions into corks and gainers.  Simply stated, the complete landing stance lands on the outside kicking leg with the performer’s momentum traveling backward.  It could be described as similar to landing from a backflip, but on the outside leg.  This landing will most often be in approximately a backside stance.
  • Hyper:  This stance is similar to the complete, but lands on the inside leg.  This generally means an additional amount of rotation is necessary.  This often comes in the form of approximately 90* of additional rotation, most often landing in approximately backside or inside stances.  This landing is widely utilized for its ability to swingthrough into master and grandmaster tricks, and wraps, as well as carrythrough into the raiz axis.
  • Mega:  Less utilized than the ‘backward’ landing stances, complete and hyper, the mega and its brother the semi are growing in popularity.  The mega is simply described as an additional 90* rotation past hyper, landing on the outside kicking leg.  Many people simplify this to a ‘hypered hyper’.  What this means in practice, is that a mega landing is a hyper landing facing the opposite direction, into the momentum, on the opposite foot (the same foot as a complete landing).  This landing allows for swingthroughs into aerial and btwist axis tricks.
  • Semi:  As mentioned in the mega description, the semi landing position is growing in popularity.  It can be described as 90* past the mega position, landing on the inside kicking leg.  In practice, this means that a semi landing is like a hyper landing, but facing the opposite direction.  This landing allows for straight frontswings into the raiz axis.  There is still some confusion on the use of the semi tag when communicating.  Because landings are most often used as prefixes or adjectives, the term semi is hyphenated with the next full rotation above it.  This means that a cork that lands semi, but has not passed the double complete stance is called a semi-double cork.  An easy way to understand this is to say that the cork has been passed, and is half way (semi) to double.  It is not uncommon for people to try to bypass this term in favor of ‘cork-semi’, but this can cause some confusion among those who have long used the semi-double language.  Arguably, landings as suffixes is more logical, but the pervasive use of terms like ‘hypercork’ and ‘megacork’ call for the continued use of ‘semi-double’ instead of ‘corksemi’ for consistency.